An Interview with Brian McWha ("Tsunami Falls")



Brian, we're very excited to chat with you again in this follow-up interview! Seems like you have been pretty busy since we last checked in. Before we dive into your new project, Tsunami Falls, how are you doing, and how is 2020 treating you?

2020 has been fairly good to me.  Vancouver’s industry shut down in March for about 10 weeks.  Like everyone, having that level of uncertainty is not ideal, but it forced me to relax for a bit and take a well needed break.  The only downside is that we are now so busy with filming, I don’t have time to work on my own projects.


What was it like to work on The Haunting of Bly Manor? (Netflix) 

I hate to admit this, but when I took the job, I had never saw The Haunting of Hill House; I had no idea what the big fuss was about.  What really blew me away was the set designs.  I have seen incredible stages before, but detail that went into the building of the house was so authentic, you almost forgot you were in a sound stage when walking though it. 

Tsunami Falls deals with an incredibly thought-provoking topic. Why was it important for you to tell this story? Is it based on any real-life experiences? (Are you a Tsunami survivor?)

I think death is a universal topic, and after having Beautiful Cake show in festivals all around the globe, I wanted to tell a story that everyone can relate to in any language.  It wasn’t based on any personal experience per se. The idea of new love, heart break, family and tragedy are things we can all relate to.  I wanted to tell a story where the audience can put themselves in the main character’s place and impose their own story.

This isn’t your first time working with Neil Chase.  Was this process different from other project?

It was a bit different.  Our past project it was far more collaborative, where we discovered the story together.  On this one, I had the story, and he came in for a clean up.  It’s really nice to have such a successful and creative person to rely on whether we are writing something together or bouncing ideas off of.